Behavioural insights for better decision making

Behavioural insights for better decision making

NSW
Sep 27
CEDA NSW Breakfast on the Run returns to examine decision making, behavioural insights, and the application of behavioural economics across the corporate and government sectors.

Speakers

William Mailer, Executive Manager, Behavioural Economics, Digital Guidance, Commonwealth Bank of Australia
Heather Cotching, Senior Advisor, BETA (Behavioural Economics Team) Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet

Event overview

Traditional policy makers assume people will make decisions in their own best interests. However, research and evidence demonstrates this isn’t always the case.

To gain traction and drive effective change, it is important to put real human behaviour at the centre of policy and program design and understand your citizen's and customer’s decision making. 

CEDA’s latest Breakfast on the Run event will examine:

  • The relationship between traditional and behavioural economics; 
  • Common behavioural biases and ways to overcome them; 
  • Leveraging the psychology of decision making to drive better customer service; and 
  • Some practical applications of how behavioural economics has improved outcomes.

Meet the speakers

William Mailer
Executive Manager, Behavioural Economics, Digital Guidance, Commonwealth Bank of Australia

William Mailer leads the CBA Behavioural Economics Team, a multi-disciplinary unit which works across the Commonwealth Bank of Australia’s business lines to improve the financial well-being of customers and communities. Prior to joining CBA, Will established and led the PwC Behavioural Economics team, an international network of practice groups providing specialist consulting services to retail, health, financial services and government sectors. Will gained his behavioural credentials from the Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (CeDEx) in Nottingham, UK.

Heather Cotching
Senior Advisor, BETA (Behavioural Economics Team) Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet

Heather Cotching is a Senior Advisor in BETA (the Behavioural Economics Team of the Australian Government). BETA is the federal Government’s first central behavioural economics team, responsible for advancing the use of behavioural economics across a wide range of public policy issues. Her team is responsible for understanding the impact of behavioural biases on public policy and translating them for a government context. Heather has a degree in economics and has worked across government for more than a decade in a range of economic policy roles, including in Treasury, the Murray-Darling Basin Authority and the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science.

Supported by CEDA member

Major sponsor