Community pulse survey



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Community pulse is CEDA's nationwide survey exploring community attitudes to growth and development.
One of the interesting features of the current Australian political and economic landscape is the apparent lack of support for reforms needed to sustain strong economic growth, notwithstanding that Australia has enjoyed the benefits of strong economic growth for over 27 years – a record run and one which is the envy of many developed economies.

The first step to Australia regaining momentum for broadbased economic reform is better understanding what the community really cares about.

In 2018 CEDA established the Community pulse survey and commissioned a poll to understand Australian public perceptions of and attitudes to growth and economic development and what they think the important issues are for their future and for the future of the nation.
 

2018 results: the economic disconnect

In 2018, CEDA released the results of its first nation-wide survey, Community pulse 2018: the economic disconnect. After 26 years of uninterrupted economic growth, this report examined how satisfied Australians were with their circumstances; who they thought had gained from this growth; and what the most important issues were for them personally and for Australia.

The 2018 survey found that that the majority of Australians did not feel they have personally gained or did not know if they have gained from Australia’s record run of economic growth. 

Key findings included:
  • Five per cent of people believe they have personally gained a lot;
  • 31 per cent of people are finding it difficult to live on their current income;
  • 74 per cent of people believe large corporations have gained a lot;
  • 79 per cent of people believe the gap between the richest and poorest Australians is unacceptable. 
Top five issues that matter the most to people personally:
  • Reliable, low cost basic health services;
  • Reliable, low cost essential services;
  • Access to stable and affordable housing;
  • Affordable, high quality chronic disease services; and
  • Reduced violence in homes and communities.
Top five critical national issues:
  • High quality and accessible public hospitals;
  • Strong regulation to limit foreign ownership of Australians land/assets;
  • High quality and choice of aged care services;
  • Increased pension payments; and 
  • Tough criminal laws and criminal sentences.
This report was a crucial step in providing the foundation to tackle these issues with new approaches, and set the scene for Connecting people with progress: securing Australia's future economic development.